Posts Tagged: ‘gold’

Gold to go, anyone? These ATMs can help

September 30, 2014 Posted by admin

Vending machines usually conjure thoughts of food and drinks, but one firm is tapping consumers’ love for something much more expensive: gold.

Two Smart Gold ATMs – vending machines that dispense a range of 24 karat gold items – were launched in Singapore this week at the Marina Bay Sands Hotel and Resorts World Sentosa, luxury venues that attract wealthy Singaporeans and a plethora of tourists.

“We chose Singapore because it’s the center of Asia, which is the center of world gold consumption,” said Kong Kok Chee, director of Asia Gold ATM, the company behind the launch, referring to Singapore’s popularity as a finance and business trading hub for the region.

“Asia accounted for more than 63 percent of total world gold consumption of gold jewelry, bars, collectibles, coins and souvenirs last year,” he said.

Read MoreGartman: ‘A treacherous, boring, nasty trade’

The Southeast Asian island nation ramped up its bid to become a trading center for gold over the past few years. In June, the Singapore Exchange announced plans to launch a physically deliverable gold contract to meet rapidly growing Asian demand. The launch was scheduled for September but has been delayed to October.

The Smart Gold ATMs dispense items ranging from one to ten gram gold bars, silver ingots and customized gold coins. Customers make purchases using a touch screen that allows them to choose from seven designs including the Singapore Merlion and various Chinese zodiac symbols.

The gold available through Asia Gold ATMs is priced once or twice daily based on benchmark gold prices. When the ATM was launched on Wednesday, a one gram pendant was priced at around 100 Singapore dollars ($80) and a ten gram pendant cost 660 Singapore dollars. Customers can pay using cash or credit cards.

Asia Gold ATM said it’s scouting out other locations in Singapore and plans to launch two or three new machines in the near future.

“We are hoping to launch more in the Asian region, such as Hong Kong, Macau and Malaysia,” added Kong.

Article source: http://www.cnbc.com/id/102030782

Platinum Prices Skid on Car-Demand Worries

September 29, 2014 Posted by admin

Platinum prices have fallen to the lowest in almost five years, as slowing growth outside of the U.S. has aroused concerns about demand for the precious metal.

It has been a bumpy year for platinum, used in jewelry and automobile exhaust filters. A five-month-long strike in South Africa, the longest ever for the nation’s platinum miners, curbed supplies earlier this year and sent prices to a near 10-month high in July. But the end of…

Article source: http://online.wsj.com/articles/platinum-prices-skid-on-car-demand-worries-1411935710

Using Vintage Electronic Parts To Make Jewelry

September 28, 2014 Posted by admin

Seattle — Steve Grzadzielewski has more than a million electronics parts lying around his house in West Seattle.

But he’s no engineer — Grzadzielewski and his sister Susan make and sell jewelry made out of vintage electronics parts. Their business, aptly named Transistor Sister, was founded in 1984, and it all started with a broken watch.

“It had all these little components in it, and they were pretty interesting,” said Susan, 56. “And I said, ‘That would make a nice earring.’ I put it through my ear. And then it was Steve. He was like, wow. Electronic jewelry designs.”

The duo began taking apart household items from telephones and calculators to washing machines and microwaves. They realized that the circuit boards they found were more than just functional — they were beautiful.

“I started looking at them as if they were objects and colors and shapes and textures just like you would any kind of art,” recalled Susan, who designs and makes Transistor Sister’s jewelry while Steve takes care of the business side. “When I used to go to Radar Electric (in Seattle), I’d take this in and say, do you have this in red? Do you have one of those in blue, I’d really like something in blue like that. And they would just look at me funny.”

By 1985, the Grzadzielewskis were traveling south to Silicon Valley to forage for parts. It was the beginning of the electronics industry in the area, and designs were changing so rapidly that companies would end up with thousands of obsolete or rejected components. Metals brokers bought up old circuit boards, made with gold, titanium and palladium, to wait for their value to rise. The Grzadzielewskis started there, paying anywhere from $20 to $40 for boxes of aesthetically pleasing capacitors, resistors, diodes and fuses. Some circuit boards cost 45 to 75 cents each, while others, like the first Intel processor, cost them $8 a chip because of the amount of gold.

With a variety of parts in hand, the jewelry design process began. Business took off immediately. The siblings recalled their first street fair on Mercer Island, Wash., before they had established prices for their pieces.

“We had to set the prices and I figured we’d start high,” said Steve. “Well, I didn’t know the demographics of Seattle. We had just moved here from the Midwest. These ladies were very well-to-do. So we were charging and they were paying all this money and I thought, Oh, my god, we’re going to be rich fast.”

At the height of their business during the late ’80s, Transistor Sister had 15 employees and 500 wholesale clients — including the Museum of Modern Art’s gift shop in New York City. Susan remembered putting in 70-hour weeks, and in 1989 the company was bringing in $350,000 in revenue. The siblings traveled all over the country, selling their jewelry at street fairs, art festivals, environmental and recycling events (“We were recycling before it was cool,” said Steve) and electronic and jewelry trade shows. Steve met John Fry of Fry’s Electronics in line for hot dog at a computer convention in San Jose, Calif., before Fry had opened his first store. The two hit it off, and Transistor Sister jewelry has been sold at Fry’s locations everywhere.

“The people who get excited about the jewelry are the people who are in the business or one of the tech companies, or people who are electronic engineers because they know that this stuff’s all vintage,” said Steve.

“I think those people are the most amazed,” added Susan, who believes that she and her brother never would have had the idea if they were engineers themselves. “It would never occur to them that it could be jewelry.”

In 1990, however, a recession hit. By 1995 the siblings decided to disband and pursue other interests. Susan became an artist and paraeducator and Steve opened a neighborhood coupon business.

But because of continued interest in their jewelry, the Grzadzielewskis decided to bring back Transistor Sister on a limited basis in 2009. Their jewelry is now available on transistorsistor.com, on Etsy and in the gift shops of a few museums around the country, including the American Computer Museum in Montana. (There are no brick-and-mortar spots to get the pieces yet in Seattle, but Steve’s got his eye on the Living Computer Museum.)

In the reboot, they’re still keeping it in the family. Steve’s daughter, 18-year-old Claire Montgomery, has taken an interest in the business and claimed Susan’s title of Transistor Sister (Susan is now Microchip Mama, and Steve is Diode Daddy). She and her boyfriend Chandler Holbert — she calls him Mr. Resistor — now help make and sell jewelry.

“It is a different generation,” said Susan. “These things are older than they are, some of these designs are older than they are, totally vintage. I think that’s what’s fun about bringing it back out.”

Article source: http://www.vnews.com/lifetimes/13710176-95/using-vintage-electronic-parts-to-make-jewelry

Trio charged after suspicious incident at Woodbury jewelry store

September 27, 2014 Posted by admin

The suspects, St. Paul resident Mario Martell Spencer, D’shun Dewayne Taylor, no permanent address, and Destiney Dupree, of Maple Grove, were all charged with fifth-degree drug possession following the Aug. 28 traffic stop.

Taylor, 20, and Spencer, 29, made their initial court appearances Sept. 8 in Washington County District Court.

The traffic stop occurred after workers at Johnson Jewelers reported the two men appeared to have been “casing” the store in an attempt to commit a robbery, according to a criminal complaint. Johnson Jewelers was the scene of an armed robbery that occurred in June where the suspect dashed to the back of the store and shot himself in the head after spotting a Woodbury police officer outside the building. The man died on the scene.

According to a criminal complaint:

Johnson Jewelers workers reported the two men were attempting to sell gold, but were going in and out of the building. The men, who smelled of marijuana, left in a convertible.

Police caught up with the suspects’ vehicle near Radio Drive and Tamarack Road. Officers smelled marijuana and asked the passengers if there was any in the car. A passenger, later identified as Spencer, handed police a cigar packed with pot.

Spencer was also found in possession of jewelry, a powdery substance and pills in a bottle. The other male passenger, later identified as Taylor, was found in possession of a white powdery substance, which he admitted was cocaine.

A backpack inside the car contained a large amount of jewelry, while a brown bag found next to Taylor contained prescription painkillers.

The driver, Dupree, 23, was also arrested after additional prescription drugs were found in her vehicle’s center console.

The complaint states Taylor admitted the bag with the pills with his and that he had a drug abuse problem. He was released from jail Sept. 8 and returns to court Nov. 13.

Spencer said he purchased the gold jewelry for $80 and that he, too, had a drug problem. He was released from jail Aug. 29 and returns to court Oct. 2.

Dupree’s initial appearance is Sept. 25.

Article source: http://www.woodburybulletin.com/content/trio-charged-after-suspicious-incident-woodbury-jewelry-store

Gold steadies above 9-month low as dollar edges off 4-yr peak

September 26, 2014 Posted by admin

Gold rose on Thursday, rebounding sharply from a nine-month low touched earlier in the session, as a sharp sell-off in U.S. equities prompted investors to buy bullion as a safe haven.

Analysts said gold prices still look vulnerable, however, because of a strong dollar and expectations of higher U.S. interest rates.

U.S. stocks were sharply lower moving into late trading, weighed down by a drop in Apple shares, as each of the major indexes fell more than one percent and the SP broke below a key support level.

“This is just an initial reaction to the hard sell-off of the equities market right now. I still think gold will fall below $1,200 on expectations of higher U.S. interest rates soon,” said Phillip Streible, senior commodities broker at RJO Futures in Chicago.

Spot gold was up 0.4 percent at $1,222 an ounce by 3:46 p.m. EDT (1946 GMT), having earlier hit a low of $1,206.85 an ounce, its weakest since Jan. 2.

U.S. COMEX gold futures for December delivery settled down $2.40 an ounce at $1,221.90, with trading volume about 40 percent above its 30-day average, preliminary Reuters data shows.

Physical demand has been subdued this year after a record 2013, when prices slumped by 28 percent. Buying of physical gold in top market China was light on Wednesday, traders said.

China’s net gold imports from main conduit Hong Kong slid to their lowest since May 2011 in August, due to adequate stocks from earlier purchases and as consumer demand remained weak, data showed on Thursday.

News of central bank purchases failed to support gold. Russia added to its gold holdings in August, while Kazakhstan raised its holdings by nearly 800,000 ounces.

Among other precious metals, spot silver was down 0.7 percent at $17.52 an ounce, spot platinum was down 0.3 percent at $1,309.50 an ounce and spot palladium was down 1.8 percent at $799.47 an ounce.

Platinum earlier fell to its lowest since June 2013 at $1,295.25 an ounce, while palladium slid to its lowest in more than four months at $792 an ounce.

(By Frank Tang and Jan Harvey; Additional reporting by A. Ananthalakshmi in Singapore; Editing by Michael Urquhart, David Holmes and Tom Brown)

 

Article source: http://www.foxbusiness.com/industries/2014/09/25/gold-steadies-above-month-low-as-dollar-edges-off-4-yr-peak/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+foxbusiness%2Flatest+(Internal+-+Latest+News+-+Text)

Warning: 3 Billion People Covet Your Gold

September 25, 2014 Posted by admin


– Posted Thursday, 25 September 2014 | | Disqus

 

By Guy Christopher

 

It has been said gold goes where it is best appreciated.  Rapidly rising wealth across Asia has Easterners in Turkey, Iran, Vietnam and China buying gold, saving gold, and using gold as money.  

 

But for most Americans and many Europeans, gold is no big deal.  What’s the explanation for the East’s love of gold and the West’s nonchalance?  Importantly, what does this mean to you?  

 

The answer is found in the histories of failed governments, shifting borders, changing flags, and collapsed currencies.   As governments crumbled over the centuries and currencies became worthless, confidence in gold and silver as true wealth was always the last man standing.  The descendants of those destroyed societies understand gold as no others can.

 

The United States and China are standout examples of polar opposite views toward gold. 

 

The United States, a nation existing for only 238 years, has not suffered centuries of calamities.  Our history has often been violent and divisive, but we’ve held onto our borders, our flag, and our form of government.  And, we still call our money the dollar, although it’s no longer backed by gold.  In fact, there are allegations of U.S. government manipulation to keep gold prices suppressed.

 

China is one of the oldest civilizations, with 3,000 years of brutal, tribal conflict, as feudal dynasties fiercely outfought and outlasted each other for a couple of hundred years here and there. 

 

China Invented Paper Money, But Are Super Wary Today

 

Chinese monetary history includes copper, gold, silver, and one curious innovation.  Over a thousand years ago, China was the first civilization to print money.  The adventurer Marco Polo carried Chinese paper money home to Europe, which in turn introduced hundreds of years of inflationary disasters and currency failures throughout the world.   

 

When the Communists came to power in 1949, they forbade private gold ownership.  Only in 2003 did China lift that ban, for keen economic and political reasons.  China feared America’s failing dollar, while studying America’s sleepwalking ignorance and disparagement of gold and silver. 

 

The Chinese government had seized an opportunity no other nation on Earth recognized.  It very quietly began fortifying its economic empire with gold.

 

Everyday Chinese shopping habits and evolving customs reveal the modern differences in East and West.

 

 

Banks invite customers to buy gold, sell gold, and use gold as collateral for loans.  Government sponsored advertising plays across China, encouraging citizens to buy and hold gold and silver.  News programs update gold and silver prices and alert listeners to bargains in premiums.   

 

Citizens get regular reminders that taking gold and silver out of the country without permission is illegal, reminding smugglers to think twice before losing their heads. 

 

Gold dealers are plentiful, from mom and pop kiosks to big city jewelers.  Upscale shops resembling night clubs stay open until the wee hours.   Hostesses carrying trays of hors d’oeuvres, drinks, and sample bars and coins circulate among customers lounging on overstuffed leather. 

 

The most important of the holiday gift-giving seasons is the Chinese New Year.  Gift shopping is easy.  No kitchen gadgets for mom or ugly ties for dad parents and children alike want, and get, gold and silver.  Analysts say purchasing for that holiday is so heavy it influences international supply and pricing.  

 

Asian buyers instinctively rush to stock up whenever prices fall.  They buy the dip, and they shop for bargains.  Long waiting lines to buy gold are not uncommon. 

 

Eleven years ago, Chinese could not legally own gold.  Today they openly discuss news and regulations regarding gold and silver. 

 

Chinese workers don’t have IRAs.  Instead, jewels, gold, and silver are customary stores of wealth.

 

 

And they are perfect for showing off.  Fashion shows feature Asian supermodels in gold-laced dresses and lingerie.  Last July, China hosted The International Gold Jewelry Beauty Queens pageant.  Yes, there was even a swimsuit event!


The U.S. and China, like all nations, are secretive about their official gold dealings.  The last credible audit of America’s gold was in 1953, despite recent political and public pressure to open the books.  Critics want answers to two questions: how much is there and who really owns it? 

 

The last official notice of China’s gold holdings astounded the financial world.  In April 2009, China announced it held 1,054 tons, almost double what was previously known.  That lifted China into fifth place among nations holding gold.  That headline helped boost gold prices in the aftermath of the financial crisis of 2008.    

 

Gold Is Flowing Out of the West and into Asian Vaults

 

China’s announcement was a shock wave to other central bankers, who were known to be selling gold.  Most of the world’s central bankers took the hint, quickly reversed course, and became buyers also.  Nervous governments (such as Germany) began asking the U.S. to return their gold.

 

Besides importing mountains of gold, China is a major mining producer, buys gold and silver mines around the world, and builds massive vaults to hold it all.  It pays with gobs of unwanted dollars. China developed the largest physical gold market in the world, the Shanghai Gold Exchange (SGE). In fact, the SGE opened for international trading last week with ceremony led by Chinas central bank chief who raved about the importance of gold ownership. China has made it clear it wants control of the worlds physical gold market.

 

Gold watchers today make two important comparisons: China is known to be buying gold, while the U.S. is strongly suspected of selling its gold. And the U.S. is widely thought to have much less than it claims, while China if fully believed to have much more than it admits.

 

China now seems wary of the paper money it invented over a thousand years ago.

 

Yes, gold goes where it is best loved and most appreciated.  That means China has backed up the truck.  If you worry who might ever buy your gold and silver, talk to the folks with thousands of years more experience with failed governments and failed currencies than we Americans have.  Be assured half the world’s population, over three billion customers, happily stand in line to buy your gold and silver with their unwanted dollars.  But don’t necessarily expect to get those precious metals back!

 

MoneyMetals.com columnist Guy Christopher is a veteran writer living on the Gulf Coast.  A retired investigative journalist, published author, and former stockbroker, Christopher has taught college as an adjunct professor and is a veteran of the 101st Airborne in Vietnam.

 


– Posted Thursday, 25 September 2014 | Digg This Article | Source: GoldSeek.com

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.
comments powered by Disqus

Article source: http://news.goldseek.com/GoldSeek/1411653840.php

Gold and silver prices continue to slide

September 24, 2014 Posted by admin


SCOTTSBLUFF, Neb. –

Gold and silver prices slid to their lowest in years and buyers are wondering what this means for them.

Silver prices reached their lowest in four years, while gold prices hit nine month lows on Monday.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the cause is rising U.S. interest rates undermining precious metals.

Tracey Bentley, owner of Bentley’s Fine Jewelry and repair says that it is a double edged sword when prices drop.

“If the customer’s going to sell some gold that they find, some old gold or inherit some gold that they don’t want and they want to just turn it into cash, well they’re not going to get as much for it as they did like last year when gold was up around 1800,” says Bentley. “But on the other hand, my product doesn’t cost me as much as it did a year ago, so in turn, the prices will be lower on my end of it.”‘

Bentley says precious metal prices will likely start to go up as soon as the holiday season gets closer.

Article source: http://www.kotatv.com/news/nebraska-news/gold-and-silver-prices-reach-record-lows/28211978

Sheboygan man charged with selling girlfriend’s wedding, engagement rings

September 23, 2014 Posted by admin

0) { %

0) { %

0) { %

Article source: http://www.sheboyganpress.com/story/news/local/2014/09/22/jewel-thief/16071667/

Transistor Sister remakes vintage computer parts as circuit chic

September 22, 2014 Posted by admin

Steve Grzadzielewski has more than a million electronics parts lying around his house in West Seattle.

But he’s no engineer — Grzadzielewski and his sister Susan make and sell jewelry made out of vintage electronics parts. Their business, aptly named Transistor Sister, was founded in 1984, and it all started with a broken watch.

“It had all these little components in it and they were pretty interesting,” said Susan, 56. “And I said, that would make a nice earring. I put it through my ear. And then it was Steve. He was like, wow. Electronic jewelry designs.”

The duo began taking apart household items from telephones and calculators to washing machines and microwaves. They realized that the circuit boards they found were more than just functional — they were beautiful.

“I started looking at them as if they were objects and colors and shapes and textures just like you would any kind of art,” recalled Susan, who designs and makes Transistor Sister’s jewelry while Steve takes care of the business side. ““When I used to go to Radar Electric (in Seattle), I’d take this in and say, do you have this in red? Do you have one of those in blue, I’d really like something in blue like that. And they would just look at me funny.”

By 1985 the Grzadzielewskis were traveling south to Silicon Valley to forage for parts. It was the beginning of the electronics industry in the area and designs were changing so rapidly that companies would end up with thousands of obsolete or rejected components. Metals brokers bought up old circuit boards, made with gold, titanium and palladium, to wait for their value to rise. The Grzadzielewskis started there, paying anywhere from $20 to $40 for boxes of aesthetically pleasing capacitors, resistors, diodes and fuses. Some circuit boards cost 45 to 75 cents each, while others, like the first Intel processor, cost them $8 a chip because of the amount of gold.

With a variety of parts in hand, the jewelry design process began. Business took off immediately. The siblings recalled their first street fair on Mercer Island before they had established prices for their pieces.

“We had to set the prices and I figured we’d start high,” said Steve. “Well, I didn’t know the demographics of Seattle. We had just moved here from the Midwest. These ladies were very well-to-do. So we were charging and they were paying all this money and I thought, Oh my god, we’re going to be rich fast.”

At the height of their business during the late 80s, Transistor Sister had 15 employees and 500 wholesale clients — including the Museum of Modern Art’s gift shop in New York City. Susan remembered putting in 70-hour weeks, and in 1989 the company was bringing in $350,000 in revenue. The siblings traveled all over the country, selling their jewelry at street fairs, art festivals, environmental and recycling events (“We were recycling before it was cool,” said Steve) and electronic and jewelry trade shows. Steve met John Fry of Fry’s Electronics in line for hot dog at a computer convention in San Jose, Calif. before Fry had opened his first store. The two hit it off, and Transistor Sister jewelry has been sold at Fry’s locations everywhere.

“The people who get excited about the jewelry are the people who are in the business or one of the tech companies, or people who are electronic engineers because they know that this stuff’s all vintage,” said Steve.

“I think those people are the most amazed,” added Susan, who believes that she and her brother never would have had the idea if they were engineers themselves. “It would never occur to them that it could be jewelry.”

In 1990, however, a recession hit. By1995 the siblings decided to disband and pursue other interests. Susan became an artist and paraeducator and Steve opened a neighborhood coupon business.

But because of continued interest in their jewelry, the Grzadzielewskis decided to bring back Transistor Sister on a limited basis in 2009. Their jewelry is now available on transistorsistor.com, on Etsy and in the gift shops of a few museums around the country, including the American Computer Museum in Montana. (There are no brick-and-mortar spots to get the pieces yet in Seattle, but Steve’s got his eye on the Living Computer Museum.)

In the reboot, they’re still keeping it in the family. Steve’s daughter, 18-year-old Claire Montgomery, has taken an interest in the business and claimed Susan’s title of Transistor Sister (Susan is now Microchip Mama, and Steve is Diode Daddy). She and her boyfriend Chandler Holbert — she calls him Mr. Resistor — now help make and sell jewelry.

“It is a different generation,” said Susan. “These things are older than they are, some of these designs are older than they are, totally vintage. I think that’s what’s fun about bringing it back out.”

Katharine Schwab: kschwab@seattletimes.com. On Twitter @kschwabable.

Want unlimited access to seattletimes.com? Subscribe now!

Article source: http://seattletimes.com/html/living/2024564843_transistorsister14xml.html

Have You Heard: Beef O’Brady’s seeking new franchise owner; Starbucks open …

September 21, 2014 Posted by admin

Wanna own a sports-pub franchise in Billings? Beef O’Brady’s is taking applications.

Officials at the Tampa, Fla.-based company said last week that they are seeking a new franchise owner after the business abruptly shut down last week at 1223 Grand Ave.

Peter Petrosian, chief development officer of Beef O’Brady’s, said the Billings franchise owners returned to their home in Arizona and were unable to sell, so they closed the doors.

The franchise was owned by Tim and Heidi Redelsperger, formerly of Bozeman, and Jim Wood of Boise, Idaho. They ran the business under a company called Fresh Concepts, which abruptly closed another restaurant in Bozeman a few months ago. They did not return a message last week seeking comment.

A sign on the door said the Billings restaurant was closed for “remodeling,” but any work inside would likely need to be approved by the new owner and the franchise.

About 20 Beef O’Brady’s employees lost their jobs in Billings.

“We’re disappointed, and it’s unfortunate,” Petrosian said, adding that he’s hoping to find a new franchise owner who could bring those workers back.

The restaurant and sports pub had been successful, Petrosian said, doing a year’s worth of business in six months.

Petrosian didn’t disclose a price and said interested entrepreneurs can email him for more information at ppetrosian@fscfranchiseco.com^p or call his office at 813-226-2333.

Beef O’Brady’s markets itself as a family-friendly sports pub, with 40 beers on tap and big-screen TVs for watching sports. The restaurant served hamburgers, Mexican food, pizza and wings.

Starbucks on Grand

A new Starbucks coffee shop has opened at the former JB’s Restaurant on 910 Grand Ave.

Construction of the new 3,011-square-foot shop began in May. It’s the sixth Starbucks in Billings. The only other stand-alone store is in front of Rimrock Mall, and the remaining shops are inside other businesses.

Sears offshoot

An offshoot of the Sears department stores has come to Eastern Montana to help supply the growing construction industry.

Officials at Sears Hometown and Outlet Stores, which spun off from the parent company two years ago, announced a new store opening earlier this month in Sidney. It’s the 11th store of its kind to open nationwide this year.

Sears Hometown and Outlet stores are smaller than traditional Sears stores, selling appliances, home and garden items, and tools.

The store is independently owned by sisters Becky and Teresa Benson and operates inside the Trifecta Home Center at 1051 S. Central Ave. in Sidney.

The Bensons said the store is meeting a need for the growing construction industry, which has been fueled by the Bakken oil shale boom.

“Working with builders and homeowners, we recognized the need for a broader product and service assortment to assist customers with their projects,” Teresa Benson said in a written statement.

Sears Hometown and Outlet stores broke off from their Chicago-based former parent in October 2012. The move was designed to free Sears Hometown from the struggling parent’s legacy costs.

Sears Holdings was hit hard during the recession and closed hundreds of stores nationwide. Last week, the company announced its Great Falls store would close in December, one of six announced closures nationwide.

Making the list

For the first time, Billings cracked the top 100 best places to live list compiled by a leading online research firm.

Livability.com ranked Billings the 98th best small-to-medium-sized city to live in its second annual survey for 2015.

The Magic City earned props for its robust economy fueled by proximity to the Bakken oil fields and growing medical, retail, tourism and IT sectors.

Billings still has a ways to go in Montana, however, placing behind Helena, Bozeman and Missoula.

Missoula was identified as the sixth most livable city in the country. Madison, Wis., was ranked number one.

The survey is based on data from public resources, such as the U.S. Census Bureau, and private-sector sources that track educations, the arts, transportation and other trends. The rankings are based heavily on affordability, access to resources within the city, available choices and usage of amenities.

Coin shop opens

A Missoula-based coin shop has expanded into Billings.

Grizzly Gold and Silver opened its new store in early September at 2450 King Ave. W., next to Best Buy.

Owner David Day said the shop buys and sells coins and precious metals and does free appraisals of bullion, placer, nuggets, tokens, jewelry, silverware and antique paper currency.

The store is open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Call 702-1516 for more information.

Haikus from the valley

Dems’ urban-core rise

Rural Repubs strong statewide

The growing purple

Article source: http://billingsgazette.com/business/columns/have-you-heard-beef-o-brady-s-seeking-new-franchise/article_312ef430-7c8e-51ce-94c7-6932f282558d.html