Posts Tagged: ‘gold’

TV: How Fox’s Marketing Fanned the…

January 30, 2015 Posted by admin

Terrence Howard and Grace Gealey in Fox’s Empire. Photo: Fox

Nothing takes the sting off a lackluster fall season like a big midseason hit. And that’s exactly the situation Fox is in with its new show Empire, which after a month on the air is the season’s top series among 18- to 49-year-olds.

The hip-hop soap opera’s Jan. 7 debut rated a 3.8, and in its second week jumped to a 4. This week’s episode scored a 4.3 rating, with a total audience of about 11.3 million.

Empire has connected powerfully with African-American audiences, who make up about 60 percent of the audience. But the show’s success wasn’t random. It has been, in fact, the result of Fox’s elaborate, months-long marketing campaign. “I’ve never seen anything like it,” said Empire showrunner Ilene Chaiken, referring to the marketing strategy behind the series. “It’s been pretty thrilling.”

The people behind the marketing, led by Fox COO Joe Earley, walked Adweek through how they pulled it off—and how it’s still evolving. Here’s what they had to say:

Midseason’s top priority

As incoming co-CEOs of Fox Television Group, Dana Walden and Gary Newman, tried to piece the network back together late last summer, they decided that Empire would be the focus of its midseason efforts, just as they had centered on Gotham in the fall. “When they started, Dana and Gary immediately made it the No. 1 priority for midseason,” Earley said. “They authorized augmenting the marketing campaign because, honestly, it was under-budgeted. They said, ‘It’s too important; we have to do it right.’ That allowed the really creative marketing team to do execution they couldn’t have otherwise.”

Market it to everyone in completely different ways

“This was a show for everyone, but we knew we were going to have to sell the show to targeted audiences,” Earley said. And importantly, they needed to do so without using the term “soap opera.”

“It’s a big, broad soap, but you don’t sell a soap as a soap, though that’s what we know that it is,” he said.

Instead, they played up the family drama and the music aspects, and they targeted the African-American and LGBT communities (one of the main characters is a gay rapper), along with the fashion world. “There’s even a little Sex in the City in Empire,” Earley said.

“As we moved forward, everything we created had to fall into multiple buckets,” said Earley, who crafted promos that would target audiences who liked scripted dramas, as well as ones centering around Taraji P. Henson’s breakout character, Cookie, which would appeal to Real Housewives fans.

The result was a layered campaign that included print, radio, online, cable, broadcast, and partners like Fox Sports and FX. “Even our theatrical side, they put our trailer in front of their word-of-mouth screenings for their movies,” Earley said. “So everyone knew this was a worthwhile project.” 

The right key art and music are everything

For Walden, one of the most vital components of Empire’s campaign was the key art, featuring a two-shot of stars Henson and Terrence Howard. “There were a lot of different ways to go,” Walden said. “You could have gone with the family. You could have gone with hip-hop. Our decision was two Oscar-nominated actors. Visually that billboard was so captivating, but it said three things: music, family, power. So you got the sense of what the show was about, and you couldn’t not look at it again and again.”

And as they searched for the best music to promote a series about the music industry, they ultimately settled on a mixture of popular artists (including Kanye West) and an original song from the series, “No Apologies,” which “was really hard because it’s new music,” Walden said. “So you can’t instantly create a tone with the music, because people aren’t familiar with it.”

Pile on the tie-ins

Beyond its many on-air promos, Fox distributed gold Empire tote bags to Black Friday shoppers in 10 malls across the country, and it targeted 450 barbershops and hair salons in 10 markets with print ads and promotional items. The network commissioned an Adidas shoe from JBF Customs, and created custom-made jewelry tied to the show.

Fox also courted male viewers by sponsoring the Manny Pacquaio-Chris Algieri pay-per-view boxing match on Nov. 22. “We’ve never done that before,” Earley said. Fox also advertised heavily during football games. The result: Empire’s audience has been 37 percent male.

Make one last premiere push

With Walden and Newman’s approval, the Empire marketing campaign swelled to the same size as Gotham’s last fall (and Sleepy Hollow’s the previous year), but it felt bigger than those, Earley said. They followed a two-week holiday lull with “a really intense media spend between New Years and the premiere. That’s why it felt like more,” he said. “I would get emails from friends at other networks who would say, ‘Can you please stop running Empire ads?’”

Increased ratings, increased spending

When Earley saw Empire’s debut ratings, “we increased our spend for week two,” he said. That pattern repeated itself after the second week. “We all absolutely, 100 percent believed [ratings] would go down 20 percent, because that’s what new shows do,” Earley said. Instead, ratings jumped 8 percent, which meant that the week three marketing spend would go up as well. The same thing happened again this past week as the ratings jumped.

As word of mouth spreads, direct viewers to VOD

Earley doesn’t think Empire’s ratings increases are finished yet. “There is real opportunity for this show to grow because there are still really large amounts of people who hopefully are going to catch up with it on [Video On Demand],” Earley said. They put video on demand (VOD) front and center in the promotion between episodes one and two. “If you saw any messaging from us, it was: Catch up on the hit and watch the new episode, because we knew there would be really positive word of mouth,” he said. “And I credit the growth from week one to week two, not to the marketing campaign, to word of mouth, to the show. So if we did our part to get people to watch it, they talked about it.”

The VOD push seems to have paid off: In its first seven days, the debut episode averaged 3.2 million views across VOD, FOX Now and Hulu.

Make sure potential new viewers can watch the whole season

Often, when a freshman show takes off in the middle of its run, audiences are prevented from watching its first episode because of in-season agreements that restrict a network to streaming only the most recent five episodes of a series. (CW is struggling with this issue with its Golden Globe-winning Jane the Virgin.) But Fox and 20th Century Fox made a stacking agreement that will enable the network to stream all episodes.

“We thought stacking was imperative for Empire because it’s hyperserialized, and I believe word of mouth will continue to spread,” Earley said. “We were really concerned that at episode six, if someone couldn’t watch the pilot anymore, we wouldn’t be able to keep drawing audience.

“I think word of mouth is going to continue to spread even when it’s off our air, and we’re going to see a very healthy consumption of it digitally,” he said.

Take advantage of social media (but not too much)

“Social has been huge,” Earley said, citing the efforts of star Henson and her 3 million Twitter followers and 2 million Instagram followers. “On social, Taraji P. Henson is a master. And it’s genuine.”

Praise from another television titan with a big following helped, too. Shonda Rhimes tweeted shortly after the premiere, “So now I am all about Empire. ALL ABOUT ‪#EMPIRE‬, tweeples.” Fox was giddy to have the endorsement of a major rival showrunner, but opted not to include it in the marketing. “Of course there was immediate discussion of: ‘How do you take advantage of that and use that to do more?’” Earley said. “And I said, ‘We need to be nothing but respectful of that.’ She did that on her own and she speaks to a very large audience.”

Let viewers buy the music

With several new original songs each episode, the music is more integral to the series than any Fox show since Glee. Replicating its successful Glee approach, Fox made Empire’s music available on iTunes. “As is typical with television, sales of it started shooting up once the episodes aired,” Earley said, who pointed to “Good Enough” and “No Apologies” as early successes. “And there are more hits coming. I think the music will probably be slower growing than Glee, because Glee was covers, but you’re going to see that these actors are also artists.”

“They are going to have very, very healthy careers of their own,” he said. “Yazz [Bryshere Gray, who plays Hakeem] already has his own career, and it’s only going to keep going.”

Help prop up American Idol

Fox also is working on ways to cross-promote Empire with its lead-in, American Idol. “I’m hoping that we will be seeing some Empire people on Idol,” Earley said. “Empire will be off the air before the live episodes of Idol start, but I still hope that we’ll have some Empire people make a visit to Idol, because the night is more compatible than is happening from a ratings standpoint, right now.” Indeed, while the network had expected to use American Idol to boost Empire’s ratings, it now has the reverse situation. Last week’s Idol was a full ratings point below Empire. “So now what we need to do is figure out, how do we get those people who are coming from Empire to realize how much fun there is in American Idol and give them a whole night?”

Chaiken said there have been “informal talks” about Idol members guest-starring on Empire (though likely not this season, which is wrapping up shortly). “It’s not an artificial collaboration,” she said. “It makes perfect sense in the world of the show, a world that we’re trying to make as real as possible.”

Renew it early, let the binge watching begin, and merchandising

Walden and Newman’s early renewal of Empire, which came after two episodes had aired, wasn’t only to help the network turn the page on its disappointing fall. “It’s also to send a signal to people that it’s safe to watch. You don’t have to stack 12 [episodes] and wait to see if we bring it back,” Earley said. “Go ahead and start watching now, and catch up whenever you can and get into the stream.” 

The quick renewal also let the consumer products team get an early start on merchandising. “It allows you to look at what would the fans be interested in having in order to deepen their relationship with the show,” Earley said. Such as? “Cookie’s cookies, right? It does seem like a no-brainer. But I would leave that up to the consumer products people to think of.”

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Article source: http://www.adweek.com/news/television/how-foxs-marketing-fanned-flames-empire-one-biggest-new-shows-years-162612

Local Museum Ups Security after SF Gold Nugget Robbery

January 29, 2015 Posted by admin

SACRAMENTO-

Since gold was discovered in California back in 1848, someone’s been trying to discover how to take it from those who’ve found it.

Jayce Pearson is frustrated over what fellow museum managers are going through in San Francisco, now that another set of robbers have developed a sinister way to strike gold.

And that’s not his only feeling on the matter.

“Oh angry…of course,” he said.

Police say three thieves treated the Wells Fargo History Museum like a McDonald’s – driving through for a grab and go of $10,000 worth of gold nuggets, holding a guard at gunpoint.

“That’s nuts man. That’s nuts. I wouldn’t imagine someone would drive through here. I don’t even know who would have the mind to even do that man,” said one San Franciscan passing the destruction.

Following a break-in last summer, Pearson’s facility, Sacramento’s Discovery Museum, is still minus the gold nuggets and quartz jewelry it used to sell in its gift shop.

The $8,000 hit to that non-profit learning center caused directors to decide not to re-stock those items.

“We’re not here to make money. We’re here to teach. And so when they rob a museum of something like that, [they] really are robbing the public of an educational value,” said Pearson.

To guard against that security is tight.

“We do have a high gate to protect our perimeter. We do have a laser  security system to let us know if there’s anybody on the premises. Every entry way has an alarm system that’s attached to it,” said Pearson.

Managers at the Sacramento History Museum didn’t return FOX40’s calls for comment about security there or concerns about its own glittering collection given what bandits did in the Bay.

Sooooo FOX40 bought tickets….to have a look at what any tourist could see.

There is ground level gold under glass. The majority of the museum’s pieces from California’s golden past are featured upstairs and warn those who get too close about alarms.

One 12-ounce ingot or solid bar of gold ready for refining is encased in a display.

It would be worth $15,500 at current gold prices.

Nearby cases without warning signs, boast the kind of bounty that may attract thieves and they’re in an enclosed hallway right next to an elevator.

Article source: http://fox40.com/2015/01/27/local-museum-ups-security-after-sf-gold-nugget-robbery/

UPDATE: Police arrest suspect in Instagram robberies

January 28, 2015 Posted by admin

UPDATE: The Lonestar Fugitive Task Force has located and arrested the suspect, identified in the arrest warrant as 19-year-old Demani Jontrell Brown. He was booked into the Travis County Jail Tuesday evening, charged with two counts of aggravated robbery. His bond is set at $40,000.

AUSTIN — An arrest warrant has been issued for a man accused of meeting up to buy items from people he contacted on Instagram and robbing them at gunpoint, according to police.

Police said a 19-year-old man, contacted at least two people on Instagram to purchase items they were selling, then met them with a gun and robbed them.

Investigators said the first robbery happened on Dec. 26, 2014 at an apartment complex in Northeast Austin. According to the warrant, the victim told police he had posted shoes for sale on Instagram, when another user contacted him and they agreed to meet. According to the warrant, the man was sitting in the backseat of a car and told the victim to get inside. When he did, the victim told police the man pointed a handgun at him and then hit him twice on the head and face, then took the shoes and the victim’s cell phone. He said the man told him to leave, and the man sped off.

A second arrest warrant states the second robbery happened downtown on Jan. 14. Investigators said a man told police that someone had stolen jewelry from him at gunpoint and ran away. The warrant states the man told police he had advertised a gold necklace for sale on Craigslist, and a man agreed to meet him at a coffee shop. When the victim arrived at the coffee shop, he told police that the man wasn’t there, so he left. Detectives said a man pointed a gun into the victim’s chest and grabbed the jewelry box, then ran away.

The warrant states the man told police he had been communicating with the man over Instagram, but after the robbery, the man had blocked the victim from accessing his Instagram page. The victim later told police he accessed the man’s Instagram account through a friend’s account and saw he had posted two photos of the necklace.

Both victims identified the man in photo lineups, according to police. He is charged with two counts of aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon. Travis County Jail records show he is not in custody.

Police said cases like this are a reminder to everyone to play it safe when buying or selling online.

“It’s not reported every day, but it’s not very uncommon. I’m sure it happens a lot more than it’s reported,” said APD Detective Steven Nash.

A tragic case in Georgia also made headlines this week, where investigators said a couple tried to buy a vintage car on Craigslist and they vanished. On Tuesday, police found their car submerged in a lake and their bodies nearby.

“I’ve gotten into a few sketchy situations,” said Craigslist user Chase Kettl. “I would definitely not go alone and at least tell someone, ‘Here’s where I’m going. Here’s the address I’m going to.’”

But even Craigslist warns users to be careful on the site.

“It is concerning because you don’t know who they are,” said Craigslist user Aaron Kettl. “I always recommend people to meet up in a parking lot.”

Police said they see cases like these about once every couple weeks. They recommended to avoid putting personal information online while buying or selling and creating a separate email account for online transactions. They also said while meeting someone in person, do it during the day, in a busy area and with other people. Police also said to be aware of buying or selling expensive items like cars, jewelry and designer shoes.

Article source: http://www.kvue.com/story/news/crime/2015/01/27/police-man-charged-after-contacting-victims-on-instagram/22404755/

X marks the jewelry: Trendy X rings, bracelets haven’t made it here — yet

January 27, 2015 Posted by admin

Just because Hollywood stars Jennifer Lawrence, Megan Fox, Amy Adams, Jessica Alba and Octavia Spencer have been sporting the chic criss-cross “X” ring and bracelet in recent months, that doesn’t mean it’s caught the eye of local fashionistas.

Not yet, anyway.

Many local stores that carry jewelry aren’t even aware of the dainty bling that many celebrities have been wearing at red carpet events. The EF Collection’s Diamond X Ring hit the fashion scene last fall when A-list celebrities were photographed wearing them to movie premiers and award shows. The lightweight, dainty and delicate ring is a thin, jewel-encrusted double band that criss-crosses on the top and bottom of the finger. The X bracelet does the same thing on the wrist.


Trendy X rings and bracelets have been spotted on A-list celebrities, such as Jessica Alba, since last fall.

Photo by
Associated Press/Times Free Press.

Other jewelry companies began making their own versions. Still, while X jewelry has yet to become a fad locally, that doesn’t mean it won’t skyrocket in popularity sometime in the near future, says Sherry Mason, who co-owns Rone Regency Jewelers in East Brainerd with her husband, Bob.

“I am not getting many requests for this style — yet,” says Mason, who adds that, personally, she likes the X style.

“(I) ordered a costume piece of the same style to have our jeweler reproduce in yellow gold for me,” she says. “We are going to a big jewelry show next month and that is a style I am looking for. I will wear mine and see the response I get.”

Mason says customers will often react positively to a trendy piece, especially if they see one in person, in fashion magazines such as InStyle or on TV shows like “Scandal.”

Suzanne West, owner of Frankie Julian’s, a fashion boutique on Frazier Avenue, says the X jewelry keeps showing up in boutiques and department stores in bigger cities.

“I was just in Miami and saw a lot of them, but I haven’t seen many around here,” she says.

West says it sometimes takes more than a year for a trend to make its way to Chattanooga.

“Some trends will never make it here, but most will trickle down eventually,” she says. “Being a small town, we tend to be about a year-and-a-half behind Europe, New York City, etc. The Southeast and Midwest are the most behind when it comes to fashion trends. Since the ring was made popular last fall, it should start to be seen here.”

She predicts higher-end jewelry stores will begin stocking X rings and bracelets soon, as well as those that offer lower prices.

Local jewelry designer Jonesy Wood is putting her own spin on the X ring.


Trendy X rings and bracelets have been spotted on A-list celebrities, such as Octavia Spencer, since last fall.

Photo by
Associated Press/Times Free Press.

“I love the X-ring trend,” says Wood, owner of Jonesy Wood Designs. “It adds an interesting twist to your accessories. You can wear yours subtle, add some bling to it or mix some different metals like 24-karat gold and rose gold.

“I love to do more trendy and fashion-forward jewelry because, as a designer, it really keeps me on my toes and my creative juices flowing.”

She says she is designing new statement rings, including an X ring, to come out in the spring.

“I sell stuff coast to coast and what sells in California may not fly here in Chattanooga but will slowly creep this way,” she says.

Cindy Brody, a jeweler at her family’s jewelry store, Brody Jewelers in Rossville, Ga., says that, while there has long been a demand for jewelry with an “X” shape on the top of the piece — as customary in many popular pieces by jewelry designer David Yurman — there hasn’t been a demand locally for the new criss-cross style. Nevertheless, the store recently stocked two styles of the ring made by designer Lafonn.

“We chose to stock the style with (cubic zirconia) rather than diamonds or other precious stones because our customers sometimes like to travel in fine jewelry that’s not expensive. This particular style is an excellent option,” she says.

At her store, the rings sell for $95 in sterling silver and $130 in rose-gold colored over sterling silver.

Colleen Murtaugh, an employee at Brody Jewelers, says that fads in jewelry, like all fashion, fluctuate in popularity and longevity.

“Jewelry trends definitely come and go, often in conjunction with fashion trends,” she says. “Top designers jump on the trend bandwagon, quite often giving it their own twist.”


Criss-cross X rings, such as this one by Lafonn ($95 in sterling silver, $130 in rose-gold over sterling at Brody Jewelers) are trending on red carpets.

Photo by
Tim Barber/Times Free Press.

Some trends, she says, have staying power.

“White gold, for example, started as a trend and now the majority of jewelry produced is white versus yellow,” she says.

That said, she doesn’t expect the criss-cross design to hang around.

“I think this style is so hot right now because of the exposure it has received by celebrities wearing them,” she says.

Contact Karen Nazor Hill at kill@timesfree press.com or 423-757-6396.

Article source: http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/life/entertainment/story/2015/jan/26/x-marks-jewelry/284539/

Jewelry store controversy returns to St. Helena

January 26, 2015 Posted by admin

ST. HELENA — After a contentious debate last year over a jewelry store on Main Street, St. Helena has another jewelry store controversy on its hands.

A store that sells jewelry and clothing will have to go through a public hearing after moving from one downtown space to another, city officials decided last week.

City officials, who had originally approved the move, told Sam Dalia of Pavati he’ll need a use permit for a jewelry store at his new space at 1210 Main St. Dalia said he planned to file an application on Wednesday.

“I want to be completely transparent,” said Dalia, who opened Pavati in 2011 at 1150 Main St. “When the city said there seemed to be an issue, we sat down to talk about how to rectify this problem.”

Dalia said he moved 98 feet north, and the application for a use permit amendment will cost him $3,500.

Since Dalia promised to apply promptly for the permit, he’ll be allowed to stay open while it’s being processed, said Interim Planning Director Victor Carniglia.

The Planning Commission is tentatively scheduled to hold a public hearing on Feb. 17, he said. In the meantime, Dalia will have comply with the use permit that requires jewelry to be an accessory use.

Carniglia said city staff originally “made a judgment call” that Dalia could move without a new permit, since the permits for both spaces allow jewelry sales as an “accessory use.”

But local jewelers cried foul last week when they saw Pavati moving into the new space, which was previously home to the consignment store Vintage Trunk.

Carniglia said that after hearing from jewelers like David Clark of David’s Jewelers, city officials realized Pavati was “a full-on jewelry store” rather than a clothing and accessory store that also sold some jewelry.

“The situation was somewhat misrepresented to staff,” Carniglia told the Planning Commission on Tuesday. “If anything, the amount of jewelry as part of the business appears to have even increased over what was at the previous location.”

Before Carniglia’s report, Kiki Furst of AF Jewelers told the commission she was frustrated to see that after so many discussions about the diversity of downtown businesses, “a new jewelry store” had been allowed to open without a public hearing.

“It’s certainly not fair, when someone like me came into town six years ago, applied for a permit, reapplied for a new permit when I moved not even a block, and followed all the rules and regulations,” said Furst.

Jewelry stores, art galleries and wine tasting rooms have drawn criticism in the last few years from locals and merchants who say they’re worried about the increasing number of downtown businesses that seem to cater primarily to tourists instead of locals.

The jewelry store Romance St. Helena opened in August after a long controversy over its use permit. A permit awarded to a previous business in the same space allowed the sale of 14-karat gold, sterling silver and semi-precious stones, but not the gold and diamond bridal jewelry that the new applicants, Steve and Judy Padis, planned to sell.

Other local jewelers said the Padises should have to apply for a new permit instead of operating under the old one, and the City Council agreed. The Padises sued the city over the denial, but eventually applied for a new use permit, which the Planning Commission approved in June.

Article source: http://napavalleyregister.com/news/local/jewelry-store-controversy-returns-to-st-helena/article_13bbeea1-55bf-54d8-9e69-c0e45b9c9815.html

Joe Rosson: Victorian jewelry set extensive and somewhat rare

January 25, 2015 Posted by admin

I have a couple of questions about my jewelry, and I am hoping you can answer them. I only know that these were given to my mother by her mother and that they are most likely Victorian. They are mosaic, and I have searched the Internet but cannot find anything similar. So, do you have any information about the history and age of these pieces, where they were made and how I might sell them if I decided to do so?

I need to start by saying that this lovely set of late Victorian jewelry is way out of my area of expertise, but I do think that I can give N.B. the end of the proverbial string that will lead her to more concrete facts about their value.

In other words, I can tell N.B. what these are, where they were likely to have been made and when, but the current value needs to be supplied by an expert in the field of late 19th century costume jewelry. I call this extensive and somewhat rare set “costume” jewelry because in my experience, the metal involved in making the pieces is not solid gold but “rolled gold” or gold plate.

The term “rolled gold” refers to a type of metal made by rolling a thin sheet of gold (usually 10 or 14 karat) over a base metal such as brass and bonding the two layers together with heat and pressure. Sometimes the metal used as a base was sterling silver, but looking closely at the photographs, I believe these pieces probably have brass as their base.

N.B. may have had trouble finding out about her items because she did not know the “password” or the name that will open up a flood of information on the Internet. These pieces are properly termed pietra dura (or pietre dure), which means “hard stone” in Italian. It is a type of jewelry that is often associated with Florence, Italy, and some called it “Florentine mosaic.”

This type of jewelry (pietra dura can also be the decorative element on larger objects such as table tops and boxes) is made from polished pieces of precious and/or semiprecious stones such as agate, lapis lazuli, jasper and chalcedony that have been cut, highly polished and arranged to form a multistone mosaic set (usually) in a black marble background.

It is generally found in floral designs. Much more rarely, images of birds perched around a birdbath or dogs will turn up. Pietra dura is said to have originated in Florence in the 16th century (1500s), but the items in today’s question appear to be circa 1885.

These pieces appear to have once been part of a “parure,” which is a matching suite of jewelry usually composed of a necklace, bracelet, pendant, broach (some people spell it “brooch”) and earrings. This set appears to be missing the necklace, which is quite a shame because the necklace should have been really spectacular.

Now for value. In retail terms, which is not what N.B. could sell it for, the set is probably worth close to $1,000 or perhaps a bit more. But if N.B. decides to sell this incredible set, the value might be more in the $500 to $600 range.

Submit questions to Joe Rosson, c/o News Sentinel, 2332 News Sentinel Dr., Knoxville, TN 37921, or to rossoncrane@yahoo.com. Questions will only be answered in this weekly column.

Article source: http://www.knoxnews.com/knoxville/life/joe-rosson-victorian-jewelry-set-extensive-and-somewhat-rare_60581212

Police log: Officers respond to standoff, no injuries reported

January 24, 2015 Posted by admin

Standoff ends without injury

DURHAM — A standoff reported Friday afternoon in southeast Durham ended without major conflict.

Police evacuated businesses on the 600 block of Ellis Road Friday afternoon and were allowed back in about 1 p.m.

The suspect reportedly was threatening to harm himself. Police did not identify the subject, but were able to talk him down from the situation.

Spectators on scene said the man had been going through a tough time lately.

 

Jewelry nabbed in burglary

DURHAM — A Durham woman reported having more than $4,000 worth of jewelry stolen from her residence on the 1200 block of Southpoint Crossing Drive.

According to Durham Police Department records between 8 a.m. on Jan. 16 and about 8:15 p.m. on Jan. 18 someone broke into the residence, damaging a door frame and stealing two yellow-gold diamond rings wroth about $3,000 along with a high school ring, a flatscreen TV and $1,000 worth of other assorted jewelry.

Police said the case is inactive.

 

Shoes, electronics stolen

DURHAM — A 17-year-old told police two pairs of Jordan sneakers and two Playstations were stolen from his home on the 100 block of Oakside Court, near Southern High School.

According to police, the teen had a Playstation 4 and a Playstation 3 along with games taken from the house, valued at about $660. He also reported two pairs of Jordan sneakers missing, valued at about $380. An iPod and Ralph Lauren cologne were also reported stolen.

A window was damaged during the break-in. The incident is under investigation.

 

In other crime news …

— Mark Glenn Foster, 45, of Spring Hope was arrested and charged with attempted common law robbery in Durham on Thursday. He was in custody at the Durham County Jail in lieu of $150,000 bond.

— Cory Michael Oleksa, 31, of Liberty Street was arrested and charged with conspiracy to sell or deliver a schedule one controlled substance, felony possession of a schedule one controlled substance, maintaining a vehicle, dwelling or place for a controlled substance, two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia, five counts of possession with intent to manufacture, sell or deliver a schedule one controlled substance and four counts of selling or delivering a schedule one controlled substance. He was in custody at the Durham County Jail in lieu of $50,000 bond.

Lauren Horsch is the police reporter for The Herald-Sun. She can be reached at 919-419-6646, or by email at lhorsch@heraldsun.com. You can follow her on Twitter at @LaurenHorsch.

 

Article source: http://www.heraldsun.com/news/showcase/x1351411529/Police-log-Officers-respond-to-standoff-no-injuries-reported

Kingold Obtains Presale Approval for Kingold Jewelry International Industry Park

January 22, 2015 Posted by admin








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Construction at Kingold Jewelry International Industrial Park – Wuhan, China, January 20, 2015
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    Construction at Kingold Jewelry International Industrial Park – Wuhan, China, January 20, 2015

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WUHAN CITY, China, Jan. 21, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — Kingold Jewelry, Inc. (“Kingold” or “the Company”) (NASDAQ: KGJI), one of China’s leading manufacturers and designers of high quality 24-karat gold jewelry, ornaments and investment-oriented products, today announced that the Company has obtained approval from the Wuhan Housing Security and Management Bureau in Wuhan, China to pre-sell certain commercial units within the Kingold Jewelry International Industrial Park (the “Jewelry Park”).

The Company formally received two separate “Certificates of Presale of Commercial Properties” from Wuhan Housing Security and Management Bureau, which cover five commercial buildings, totaling approximately 123,600 square meters (approx. 1,330,000 square feet).

The Company is now seeking potential buyers for these commercial properties, and is expected to utilize any proceeds from the presale of these units to complete construction on the Jewelry Park. Kingold expects to complete the Jewelry Park within the previously announced timeframe, and plans to schedule a grand opening ceremony in December 2015.

Zhihong Jia, Chairman and CEO of Kingold, stated, “We are pleased to have received approval from the local government to move forward in pre-selling several of our properties, which was a necessary requirement as we move forward. We have received considerable interest in the properties from potential buyers as the Jewelry Park has begun to take shape, and are focused on completing all phases of the development for this project. We are now focused on the interior and exterior design elements and expect to remain on track to open the Jewelry Park by December 2015.”

Background on the Jewelry Park

In October 2013, Kingold entered into an agreement to acquire the operating rights for 66,667 square meters (approximately 717,598 square feet, or 16.5 acres) of land in Wuhan for an aggregate purchase price of RMB1 billion (approximately US$164 million at the then effective spot rate). The Company intends to utilize the completed Jewelry Park as its new operation center and show room. Kingold also plans to rent space within the Jewelry Park to other jewelry manufacturers in China, in addition to selling developed commercial and residential properties to individual and corporate buyers.

About Kingold Jewelry, Inc.

Kingold Jewelry, Inc. (NASDAQ: KGJI), centrally located in Wuhan City, one of China’s largest cities, was founded in 2002 and today through a variable interest entity, or VIE, relationship with Wuhan Kingold Jewelry Company Limited, a corporation incorporated in the People’s Republic of China, is one of China’s leading designers and manufacturers of 24-karat gold jewelry, ornaments, and investment-oriented products. The Company sells both directly to retailers as well as through major distributors across China. Kingold has received numerous industry awards and has been a member of the Shanghai Gold Exchange since 2003. For more information, please visit www.kingoldjewelry.com.

Business Risks and Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements that are subject to the safe harbors created under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. You can identify these forward-looking statements by words such as “expects,” “believe,” “project,” “anticipate,” or similar expressions. The forward-looking statements in this release include statements regarding Kingold’s Jewelry Park and its estimated time of completion and grand opening, Kingold’s expected use of proceeds from the presale of the commercial units within the Jewelry Park, as well as the Company’s ability to attract tenants and engage in sales of additional portions of the Jewelry Park property. Readers are cautioned that actual results could differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks, including those contained in Kingold’s SEC filings available at www.sec.gov, including Kingold’s most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date on which they are made. Kingold undertakes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements for any reason.

Company Contact
Kingold Jewelry, Inc.
Bin Liu, CFO
Phone: +1-847-660-3498 (US) / +86-27-6569-4977 (China)
bl@kingoldjewelry.com

INVESTOR RELATIONS
The Equity Group Inc.
Katherine Yao, Associate
+86 10-6587-6435
kyao@equityny.com

Adam Prior, Senior Vice President
(212) 836-9606
aprior@equityny.com

Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150121/170445

SOURCE Kingold Jewelry, Inc.



Article source: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/kingold-obtains-presale-approval-for-kingold-jewelry-international-industry-park-300023528.html

Kingold Obtains Presale Approval for Kingold Jewelry International Industry Park

January 21, 2015 Posted by admin

WUHAN CITY, China, Jan. 21, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — Kingold Jewelry, Inc. (“Kingold” or “the Company”) (NASDAQ: KGJI), one of China’s leading manufacturers and designers of high quality 24-karat gold jewelry, ornaments and investment-oriented products, today announced that the Company has obtained approval from the Wuhan Housing Security and Management Bureau in Wuhan, China to pre-sell certain commercial units within the Kingold Jewelry International Industrial Park (the “Jewelry Park”).

Construction at Kingold Jewelry International Industrial Park - Wuhan, China, January 20, 2015

The Company formally received two separate “Certificates of Presale of Commercial Properties” from Wuhan Housing Security and Management Bureau, which cover five commercial buildings, totaling approximately 123,600 square meters (approx. 1,330,000 square feet).

The Company is now seeking potential buyers for these commercial properties, and is expected to utilize any proceeds from the presale of these units to complete construction on the Jewelry Park. Kingold expects to complete the Jewelry Park within the previously announced timeframe, and plans to schedule a grand opening ceremony in December 2015.

Zhihong Jia, Chairman and CEO of Kingold, stated, “We are pleased to have received approval from the local government to move forward in pre-selling several of our properties, which was a necessary requirement as we move forward. We have received considerable interest in the properties from potential buyers as the Jewelry Park has begun to take shape, and are focused on completing all phases of the development for this project. We are now focused on the interior and exterior design elements and expect to remain on track to open the Jewelry Park by December 2015.”

Background on the Jewelry Park

In October 2013, Kingold entered into an agreement to acquire the operating rights for 66,667 square meters (approximately 717,598 square feet, or 16.5 acres) of land in Wuhan for an aggregate purchase price of RMB1 billion (approximately US$164 million at the then effective spot rate). The Company intends to utilize the completed Jewelry Park as its new operation center and show room. Kingold also plans to rent space within the Jewelry Park to other jewelry manufacturers in China, in addition to selling developed commercial and residential properties to individual and corporate buyers.

About Kingold Jewelry, Inc.

Kingold Jewelry, Inc. (NASDAQ: KGJI), centrally located in Wuhan City, one of China’s largest cities, was founded in 2002 and today through a variable interest entity, or VIE, relationship with Wuhan Kingold Jewelry Company Limited, a corporation incorporated in the People’s Republic of China, is one of China’s leading designers and manufacturers of 24-karat gold jewelry, ornaments, and investment-oriented products. The Company sells both directly to retailers as well as through major distributors across China. Kingold has received numerous industry awards and has been a member of the Shanghai Gold Exchange since 2003. For more information, please visit www.kingoldjewelry.com.

Business Risks and Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements that are subject to the safe harbors created under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. You can identify these forward-looking statements by words such as “expects,” “believe,” “project,” “anticipate,” or similar expressions. The forward-looking statements in this release include statements regarding Kingold’s Jewelry Park and its estimated time of completion and grand opening, Kingold’s expected use of proceeds from the presale of the commercial units within the Jewelry Park, as well as the Company’s ability to attract tenants and engage in sales of additional portions of the Jewelry Park property. Readers are cautioned that actual results could differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks, including those contained in Kingold’s SEC filings available at www.sec.gov, including Kingold’s most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date on which they are made. Kingold undertakes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements for any reason.

Company Contact
Kingold Jewelry, Inc.
Bin Liu, CFO
Phone: +1-847-660-3498 (US) / +86-27-6569-4977 (China)
bl@kingoldjewelry.com

INVESTOR RELATIONS
The Equity Group Inc.
Katherine Yao, Associate
+86 10-6587-6435
kyao@equityny.com

Adam Prior, Senior Vice President
(212) 836-9606
aprior@equityny.com

Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150121/170445

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/kingold-obtains-presale-approval-for-kingold-jewelry-international-industry-park-300023528.html

SOURCE Kingold Jewelry, Inc.





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Article source: http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/articles/prnewswire/CN12506.htm

My love for gadgets is purely physical

January 20, 2015 Posted by admin

There’s something in the physical bond I developed with my old computer that speaks to why and how we fall in love with technology. I hooked on to the one aspect about my mass-produced MacBook that was unlike its millions of brethren: the physical flaw that distinguished it. Prior to that, I had a Seiko watch that I wore for years, and it too had a scratch, this one sitting prominently above the 4- and 5-hour markers on the watch face. That scratch was with me on my first date with a girl I loved, in the exam hall during my law degree, and, on one occasion, at Gatwick Airport when I had to sprint to catch a flight. Some of the most profoundly emotional moments of my life were shared with a watch, which I knew was my own by its unique, albeit imperfect, appearance. After that Seiko, every other watch felt cold, sterile, and inorganic by comparison. They told the time, but not my time.

It’s been hard to find such vectors of physical connection with modern consumer electronics. The typical smartphone choice has been between soft, insipid plastic — such as Samsung made infamous with its line of Galaxy phones — and the excessively fussy and precisely machined aluminum shells of an iPhone or HTC One. The former class of devices are simply unlovable and the latter feel so damn precious that I end up hiding them away in silly cases.

Things are starting to change for the better, though, and Motorola’s Moto Maker service is a big part of that shift. It offers a broad choice of colors in combination with various new materials (including leather!) to let me specify a phone that’s distinctly mine without requiring that I spoil it in some uniquely Vlad way. Sure, there will be others who choose the same metallic orange Moto X with a bamboo back as me, but that’s a far smaller group than the tens of millions of space gray iPhone owners.

moto x

Conformity is for technical standards, not aesthetic decisions

I hate bad design, but I hate conformity even more, and the individualization that Moto offers will, over the course of a phone’s lifetime, engender greater loyalty and care for the device. Parents would struggle to love their children if they were all clones, and the same is true of us when it comes to the gadgets and devices we hold dear.

The future is going to provide a lot more opportunity for personal electronics to become truly personal. Apple’s Watch was announced under the banner of endless customizability — with “millions and millions” of options, according to Jony Ive — and there’s already a wide diversity of choice on offer from wearable device makers like Fitbit and Jawbone. By the end of this year, every smartphone manufacturer will also have a smartwatch or some other wearable to sell you, which will open up a whole new world of materials, shapes, sizes, and designs to choose from. Moto seems like the outlier today, but before long every purveyor of electronics will have to have some expertise in more exotic materials like leather, gold, and even platinum as technology moves closer to jewelry and further away from its image as a bland, plastic, unnatural thing.

nokia lumia 800

The future might be curvier and more seductive than most of us imagined

None of these new gadgets will be as indispensable as the smartphone or laptop anytime soon, but their presence and customizable nature are setting new expectations for consumer electronic purchases. Phones are already becoming more organic in their design. The iPhone 6 and Xperia Z3 feel so much nicer than their blocky predecessors because they’ve done away with the straight edges and curved every surface: technology demands squares and cubes, but the human hand is most comfortable with ellipses and cylinders.

The next stage in the evolution of smartphones, and of consumer electronics in general, is to give the user real control over the look and feel of the device so that it can be made to feel distinct. I’ve no doubt that the greatest innovation and utility of future technology will come through software rather than hardware, but it will be the physical things that carry our smart and connected worlds within them that we’ll grow attached to.

My old watch told me my time and my laptop took my notes, but their unique and strangely lovable aspects arose as accidents of wear and tear. The personal tech companies that succeed in the future will do so by recreating the same sense of tangible, tactile connection between their device and its owner that I’ve felt all these years about my less-than-perfect gadgets.

Article source: http://www.theverge.com/2015/1/20/7856171/gadget-and-smartphone-personalization-is-the-future