Bensalem Man, Uncle, Stole Jewelry from Montgomery Twp. Home, Where They …

August 27, 2014 Posted by admin

A Bensalem man faces felony charges of theft, receiving stolen property and conspiracy to commit theft after he allegedly conspired with his uncle to steal and sell more than $2,375 in stolen jewelry, taken from a Montgomery Township home where they were hired as painters, police said.

Michael Romano Jr., is free on $10,000 unsecured bail, and has a preliminary hearing set for Sept. 8 before District Judge Andrea Duffy, according to court records.

Romano’s uncle, James Wertz, 40, of Philadelphia, faces the same charges, but his case remains inactive, per court records.

On May 31, a theft of jewelry was reported by a resident on the 3000 block of Elizabeth’s Court, police said. The theft occurred between May 27 and May 30, and the resident was not home, due to extensive work being done to the interior of the home, including painting and modification of a fire suppression system, police said.

The resident told police that two pieces of jewelry were taken from her jewelry box in her bedroom: a princess cut, 14-karat, yellow gold, designer diamond ring, valued at $2,375, and a 14-karat gold rope chain, police said.

Police interviewed Romano Jr. on June 17, who worked at the home as a painter, police said, along with Wertz.

Romano was told he was free to leave at any time and did not have to answer questions, police said.

Romano made a statement to officers that they knew to be false, police said. When confronted with the false statement, Romano allegedly said he sold the two pieces of jewelry, police said. He told police Wertz stole the jewelry and asked him to sell it at a pawn shop, police said.

Romano Jr. allegedly sold the jewelry on May 28 at Philly Gold and Diamonds in Franklin Mills Mall in Philadelphia, police said. He told police Wertz was with him when the jewelry was sold.

Romano told police he allegedly received $175 for the jewelry, which he gave to Wertz, police said. In turn, Wertz allegedly gave Romano $25 for the transaction, police said.

Police then interviewed Wertz, who was told he was not under arrest and could leave at any time. Wertz denied involvement in the theft, police said. During the interview, Wertz was asked if he had ever pawned jewelry at Philly Gold and Diamonds, or if he had been present when any jewelry was sold at that location, police said. Wertz then abruptly stood up, and said, “I want to leave,” and then left the station, police said.

On June 19, officers visited the pawn shop and obtained paperwork, which indicated Romano Jr. sold a gold chain and ring for $175 on May 28, police said. Police took possession of the chain and ring.

The alleged victim identified the jewelry as the items stolen from her home, police said.

Article source: http://thealternativepress.com/articles/bensalem-man-uncle-stole-jewelry-from-montgomer

Bensalem Man, Uncle, Stole Jewelry from Montgomery Twp. Home, Where They …

August 27, 2014 Posted by admin

A Bensalem man faces felony charges of theft, receiving stolen property and conspiracy to commit theft after he allegedly conspired with his uncle to steal and sell more than $2,375 in stolen jewelry, taken from a Montgomery Township home where they were hired as painters, police said.

Michael Romano Jr., is free on $10,000 unsecured bail, and has a preliminary hearing set for Sept. 8 before District Judge Andrea Duffy, according to court records.

Romano’s uncle, James Wertz, 40, of Philadelphia, faces the same charges, but his case remains inactive, per court records.

On May 31, a theft of jewelry was reported by a resident on the 3000 block of Elizabeth’s Court, police said. The theft occurred between May 27 and May 30, and the resident was not home, due to extensive work being done to the interior of the home, including painting and modification of a fire suppression system, police said.

The resident told police that two pieces of jewelry were taken from her jewelry box in her bedroom: a princess cut, 14-karat, yellow gold, designer diamond ring, valued at $2,375, and a 14-karat gold rope chain, police said.

Police interviewed Romano Jr. on June 17, who worked at the home as a painter, police said, along with Wertz.

Romano was told he was free to leave at any time and did not have to answer questions, police said.

Romano made a statement to officers that they knew to be false, police said. When confronted with the false statement, Romano allegedly said he sold the two pieces of jewelry, police said. He told police Wertz stole the jewelry and asked him to sell it at a pawn shop, police said.

Romano Jr. allegedly sold the jewelry on May 28 at Philly Gold and Diamonds in Franklin Mills Mall in Philadelphia, police said. He told police Wertz was with him when the jewelry was sold.

Romano told police he allegedly received $175 for the jewelry, which he gave to Wertz, police said. In turn, Wertz allegedly gave Romano $25 for the transaction, police said.

Police then interviewed Wertz, who was told he was not under arrest and could leave at any time. Wertz denied involvement in the theft, police said. During the interview, Wertz was asked if he had ever pawned jewelry at Philly Gold and Diamonds, or if he had been present when any jewelry was sold at that location, police said. Wertz then abruptly stood up, and said, “I want to leave,” and then left the station, police said.

On June 19, officers visited the pawn shop and obtained paperwork, which indicated Romano Jr. sold a gold chain and ring for $175 on May 28, police said. Police took possession of the chain and ring.

The alleged victim identified the jewelry as the items stolen from her home, police said.

Article source: http://thealternativepress.com/articles/bensalem-man-uncle-stole-jewelry-from-montgomer

Five Steps to Get the Most Money Selling Your Jewelry

August 25, 2014 Posted by admin

One of the most common ways to make money selling gold or silver is through jewelry. It’s one of those items that accumulates over time. Sometimes, the jewelry goes out of fashion, or an earring gets lost. Whatever your reason for selling, if you want to get the most money for your jewelry, just follow these simple steps.

1. Research Your Jewelry
The first step in getting the most for your jewelry is knowing what it is that you have. Sometimes items are handed down to you with a colorful family tale. Your great aunt Beatrice may have been telling you what she thought was the truth when she said that was a genuine Art Deco white gold and diamond ring. Not to say anything bad about aunt Beatrice, but sometimes what one thinks is the truth, isn’t. Especially when it comes to family heirlooms.
So do your research. Test the metal to make sure it’s genuine gold. This can be done cheaply and easily. You can buy a metal test online for less than $20. In addition to testing, find out everything you can about the piece. You will typically find stamps on jewelry that indicate the brand, metal purity, and even the age. All of this will help you determine its value more accurately.

2. Find a Buyer
Many gold buyers have little experience properly evaluating jewelry, and will simply quote you the price of gold, not taking into consideration the value of the gemstones. A good buyer should weigh the jewelry in front of you. Then they should be able to explain how much gold or silver is in the piece by subtracting the estimated weight of the stones—or anything else not made of gold or silver. They should tell you how much the stones are worth, if anything. And finally, they should know if there is any intrinsic value or collectibility to the piece. Good buyers are well established and have a long history of buying jewelry.

3. Know the Price of Gold and Silver
The more precious metal in the jewelry, the more the piece is worth. The current price of gold or silver is known as the spot price. No gold buyer is going to pay you the spot gold price. They will pay you the melt price—what it costs to melt the precious metal down to its purest form. And each gold buyer will take a small percentage as a commission. This commission and their ability to accurately estimate the jewelry’s value is why you will see evaluations of the same piece vary from buyer to buyer.  It’s why you should do your homework and research buyers. 

4. Be Realistic
It’s important that you’re honest with yourself about your jewelry, especially if it has sentimental value to you. You need to understand that you’re not going to get retail value for your jewelry. If you’re unwilling to take anything less than retail for your jewelry, then maybe you’re not ready to let go of it yet. And that’s OK. It’s better to just be honest and wait until you are ready. Trying to shop around and get a price that’s not realistic will simply frustrate you.

5. How Buyers Make Money
Once you’ve done your research, it’s time to get out there. Be sure to ask for a free evaluation and don’t let anyone pressure you into selling. Some businesses try to pay you more (and make less for themselves), but make up the difference in volume. Others will attempt to pay you less and make more on fewer transactions. Bellevue Rare Coins prefers the first approach.

Bellevue Rare Coins specializes in gold buying and dealing in rare coins. We are a family-owned business located in Bellevue and Lynnwood. We also buy and sell silver, diamonds, currency and jewelry. Visit us first for a free evaluation. 
Did you like this post? Share it, +1 on Google+, or Like on Facebook.

Article source: http://www.kirotv.com/news/lifestyles/shopping/five-steps-get-most-money-selling-your-jewelry/ng8hY/

Vineland Police for Aug. 24

August 24, 2014 Posted by admin

• Rafael Valentin, 48, of the 300 block of North Eighth Street was arrested Friday on charges of burglary, criminal mischief and possession of burglary tools. Police were dispatched to St. Paul’s Missionary Baptist Church on the 100 block of West Wood Street after an anonymous caller reported someone walked behind the church. Police found Valentin in a shed behind the church. The shed had been forced open by Valentin, using a screwdriver, police said. Nothing was stolen from the shed, and Valentin told police he he was going to sleep in it until the morning. Once morning came, he planned to steal a piece of lawn equipment and sell it, he told police. Valentin, who also was sought in Atlantic County, was turned over to Cumberland County Jail with bail set at $50,000.

• Three men were charged with drug possession Aug. 16 after police found a bag of suspected cocaine in a vehicle that crashed early that morning near South Brewster Road and Franklin Drive. The men are Darious E. Negron, 23, of the 2700 block of East Chestnut Avenue; Isaiah S. Cisrow, 24, of the 800 block of East Chestnut Avenue; and Michael Cisrow, 22, of the first block of Suncrest Avenue, Bridgeton.

• Christina L. Rose, 24, of Laurel Springs was arrested about 4 p.m. Saturday and charged with shoplifting at Walmart on West Landis Avenue. Police said she stole four packages of hair dye, one package of eye makeup, three containers of lip gloss, one container of nail enamel, two pairs of women’s shorts, a gold key ring and a set of razor blades. A store loss prevention employee tried to stop Rose, but she fled in her vehicle. Police located Rose and arrested her.

• A 2001 Gas Gas brand yellow motorcycle, valued at $2,500, was reported stolen Thursday from the bed of a pickup truck in the Hampton Inn parking lot on the 2100 block of West Landis Avenue. The thief cut nylon straps holding the dirt bike and cut a steel cable lock securing it to the truck.

• A handbag was stolen from a shopping cart after its owner accidentally left it behind Thursday in the Walmart parking lot on West Landis Avenue. Police described the suspect as a heavyset black man in his early 30s who is about 5 feet inches tall and weighs 225 to 245 pounds. He drove a green or silver Dodge pickup and was wearing a white T-shirt, brown or black shorts that went down to his knees, a necklace with a cross, a blue bandanna and glasses.

• A pack of Newport cigarettes and a Samsung Galaxy Exhibit cellphone were reported stolen Friday morning from a home on the 600 block of South Second Street. The suspect was described as a Hispanic male who is about 5 feet 8 inches tall and weighs 180 pounds, with brown eyes and brown hair; he wore black pants, a blue polo shirt, a black and red baseball hat with red lettering, and had his hair in a ponytail.

• The word “Purge was scratched into it the trunk of a black Ford Focus on the 800 block of Timberbrook Drive. The crime was reported Saturday.

• Five rings and other jewelry with a total estimated value of $6,000 were reported stolen Saturday from a home on the 700 block of East Plum Street.

• Copper pipe was cut and stolen from air conditioner units at Heat Wave Salon on the 200 block of South Delsea Drive. The crime was reported Thursday.

• Spark plugs and paperwork were reported stolen from a vehicle, whose window was damaged, on Wednesday in an alley on the 700 block of East Landis Avenue.

• A stereo was reported stolen Thursday from a vehicle in the ShopRite parking lot on East Landis Avenue.

• Cash, a radio, two cellphones, a passport and a wallet were reported stolen Thursday from a pickup truck at Lucca Freezers on the 2300 block of Industrial Way. A window on the truck was broken.

• A Weber propane grill was reported stolen Friday from a carport on the first block of North Valley Avenue.

• Registration and insurance cards were reported stolen Friday from a pickup truck on the 1100 block of New Pear Street.

• Alfredo Figueroa III, 26, of the 800 block of Foster Avenue was arrested Tuesday on a a warrant for failure to appear in Vineland Municipal Court.

• Marrisa Maven, 23, of the 800 block of West Forest Grove Road was arrested Wednesday on a Vineland Municipal Court warrant.

• A weed trimmer and two aluminum ramps were reported stolen Thursday from a shed on the first block of South State Street. The door of the shed had been kicked in.

• Diane Fentress, 40, of the 500 block of Irving Avenue, Bridgeton, was arrested Friday on a Vineland Municipal Court warrant and held on $1,001 bail in Cumberland County Jail.

• A Northwood Drive man reported he received an email Saturday indicating his brother was stranded in the Philippines and needed $2,450 wired to him so he could leave. The man called his brother and learned he was fine and had not traveled to the Philippines.

• Roy J. Henry, 43, of Foster Avenue was arrested Thursday on warrants from Cumberland County Superior Court and Vineland Municipal Court. He was held on $4,252 bail in the county jail.

• Richard B. Pierce, 41, of West Peach Street was arrested late Friday night and charged with shoplifting a cellphone and razor blades at Walmart on West Landis Avenue.

• Marcos Rivera, 32, of South Rogers Avenue was arrested Wednesday and charged with shoplifting a pressure washer at Home Depot at Cumberland Mall.

• Douglas Dwight, 52, of Palermo Avenue was arrested Tuesday afternoon and charged with shoplifting flowers valued at $9.71 at ShopRite on West Landis Avenue. He also was charged with resisting arrest.

Article source: http://www.thedailyjournal.com/story/news/crime/2014/08/24/vineland-police-aug/14534609/

Jewelry Leaders and CEOs Join Enough Project in Conflict Gold Solutions Forum

August 23, 2014 Posted by admin

EDITOR’S NOTE: This blog was written by Enough Project intern Irina Balytsky.

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in the Great Lakes Region of Africa has been entrenched in conflict for nearly 20 years. Militias control artisanal mines and minerals, specifically tin, tantalum, tungsten, and gold, and profit when minerals are sold into the global supply chain through illegal networks.

In July 27, 2014, CEOs and trade leaders met with experts in New York City for one of the first-ever public events addressing conflict-free gold sourcing to be hosted by the jewelry industry. The event centered on the value of responsible sourcing, industry experiences, and tools to help build upon current initiatives. 

The event featured presentations by Enough Project Policy Associate Holly Dranginis and Signet Jewelers Vice President of Corporate Affairs David Bouffard, followed by a panel discussion. The panel included Anna Bario, co-founder of the independent jeweler Bario Neal; David Bouffard; Holly Dranginis; John Green, President and CEO of Lux Bond Green; and Scott Wanstrath, CEO of Continental Jewelry USA. David Bonaparte, President and CEO of Jewelers of America (JA), gave opening remarks, and Jennifer Peyser, Senior Mediator at Resolve, facilitated the discussion.  

“We were thrilled to be invited onto the jewelry industry’s home turf to present and share opportunities with retailers and refiners about how they can become leaders in a growing global movement to end the trade of conflict gold from Congo,” says Dranginis. “Company representatives were really engaged and interested in finding out more about the situation in Congo and the practical steps they could take to support peace there.”

In addition to addressing challenges in the Great Lakes Region, participants learned about and discussed resources available for companies to address conflict minerals in their supply chains and opportunities to support responsible sourcing and development in the region. Participants also highlighted the need for jewelry industries, civil society, and government to cooperate in order to foster improved responsible gold sourcing.

In her presentation, Holly Dranginis informed participants of the conflict in the Great Lakes Region, stressed the significance of jewelry industry engagement in sourcing gold responsibly, and “identified opportunities for the industry to contribute to solutions.” Ms. Dranginis emphasized that efforts to exercise due diligence in the DRC have enabled traceable minerals to sell at higher prices than non-traceable minerals, thereby reducing significant funding sources to armed groups who terrorize civilians. However, in spite of these successes, gold is now the most lucrative mineral and remains a major driver of conflict in the DRC. As such, she presented three examples of ways the jewelry industry can help end conflict gold trade in the DRC: 1) by developing and participating in supply chain due diligence protocols, 2) by supporting strategic community development initiatives, and 3) by investing in conflict-free gold mines in the Great Lakes Region to give companies opportunities to source directly from DRC and contribute to economic development locally. 

David Bouffard emphasized Signet Jewelers’ commitment to responsible sourcing and described the company’s approach. Signet has been a major leader in the jewelry industry on supply chain due diligence and helping end the conflict gold trade. Signet believes that “a responsible supply chain is fundamental to the reputation of the jewelry industry and has been active in the development of industry-wide standards.” Signet developed a set of guidelines for its gold suppliers with input from civil society and government partners, called the Signet Responsible Sourcing Protocols (SRSP), under which suppliers must authenticate, endorse, and audit gold from all sources utilized. In building a responsible sourcing policy, the company learned that its gold supply chain is complex, comprised of at least 1,000 distinct chains. Signet has also learned that international coalition support of responsible sourcing procedures will advance global awareness and compliance. Finally, the company has discovered that if the standards used to audit suppliers were harmonized across the industry, the burden on suppliers would be reduced.

Some key themes emerged from the panel conversation. Mr. Wanstrath and Ms. Bario specifically discussed their experiences with and support of responsible sourcing. To highlight positive change, the panelists noted that sharing stories that champion positive activities to make industry-wide change can help bring about beneficial responses from the public. The government plays an important role, and Ashley Orbach, Senior Advisor on Conflict Minerals and Precious Stones in the U.S. Department of State, talked about the government’s work with U.S.-based companies to understand the impacts of government initiatives and work together to break the link between conflict minerals and natural resources. 

Looking ahead, participants noted a need for tangible advice for jewelry and retail companies. Roundtable organizers offered their assistance and voiced interest in planning future events to disseminate information amongst partners in the jewelry and retail industries, civil society, and government. Enough was thrilled to be invited by JA to be part of the conversation and looks forward to even more positive engagement with diverse stakeholders in the gold industry.

For more details about the event and helpful additional resources for companies, NGOs, and consumers, see the full summary.

Article source: http://www.enoughproject.org/blogs/jewelry-leaders-and-ceos-join-enough-project-conflict-gold-solutions-forum

Three gang members nabbed with stolen goods in Mountain View, police say

August 22, 2014 Posted by admin

Three members of the Sureño street gang were arrested Wednesday for possessing stolen property and other violations, Mountain View police said.

A press release says the suspects are Rigoberto Lopez, 22, of Sunnyvale; a 16-year-old Sunnyvale boy; and a 13-year-old Redwood City girl.

They tried to sell gold jewelry at a jewelry store on the 600 block of Escuela but were thwarted, police said. When undercover and code enforcement officers contacted them outside the shop, they discovered a bag full of electronics, additional gold jewelry and drug paraphernalia, according to the press release.

Upon further investigation, police found that the goods had been stolen during a recent residential burglary in Sunnyvale.

Police also said that a rash of burglaries and thefts triggered a recent amendment to the municipal code that requires second-hand jewelry dealers to accurately document their purchases from private citizens.

The city’s jewelry dealers were informed of the new ordinance and provided with requisite documentation during a three-month grace period, police added.

“We were seeing criminals from outside of the area coming into Mountain View to sell their stolen property,” Minor stated in the press release. “This case is a great example of compliance leading to an arrest.”

To leave an anonymous tip about this incident, call 650-961-5800 or text to 274637 and include MVTips in your message.

Email Rhea Mahbubani at rmahbubani@dailynewsgroup.com or follow her at twitter.com/RMahbubani.

Article source: http://www.mercurynews.com/peninsula/ci_26383911/three-gang-members-nabbed-stolen-goods-mountain-view

How to Find a Pot of Gold

August 21, 2014 Posted by admin

An alternative (and more popular) interpretation involves tales of Scandinavian invaders burying their hordes of gold in various places around the island. When the Vikings returned home, they didn t remember all the spots where they buried their treasure, and a different kind of mythical folk found their treasure: the leprechauns.

As the story goes, leprechauns are mainly harmless creatures, perhaps a little mischievous and fond of the occasional quaff of homemade whiskey. And while leprechauns are often associated with vast riches and gold, in folklore they spend most of their time making shoes for their brethren who enjoy dancing so much that they can wear out a good pair of boots in a single evening of revelry.

If you happen to stumble upon a leprechaun, tread lightly, because they can be wily creatures. If you capture him, you might be granted a wish or a few coins from his stash. If you want the whole pot of gold, you ll need to find the end of a rainbow, because according to legend, that s where the leprechauns bury their gold.

Despite your best efforts, getting to the end of a rainbow whether you re looking for the treasure troves of the faeries or a leprechaun s pot of gold is not such an easy thing to do. Rainbows are created when sunlight reflects off raindrops, breaking the light into different wavelengths of color. As you move toward the pot of gold, the rainbow that your eyes see moves as well, because the raindrops are at different spots in the atmosphere. The rainbow s end, and its elusive pot of gold, will always seem to move away from you at the same rate that you approach it.

On this St. Patrick s Day, why not look for gold in a more reliable place? Bellevue Rare Coins has a rich collection of gold jewelry, gold coins and gold bullion and the experts on staff love to talk about buying and collecting gold. And if you re interested in selling your gold, stop by one of our two locations in Bellevue or Lynnwood for a free, no-pressure evaluation of what your gold is really worth.

Bellevue Rare Coins specializes in gold buying and dealing in rare coins. We are a family-owned business located in Bellevue and Lynnwood. We also buy and sell gold, silver, diamonds, currency and jewelry. Visit us first for a free evaluation.

Did you like this post? Share it with your friends or like it on Facebook.

Bellevue Rare Coins| Located at10541 NE 4th St,Bellevue,WA. |Phone:425-454-1283. |http://bellevuerarecoins.com.

Article source: http://www.king5.com/story/life/shopping/gold-coins/2014/03/19/how-to-find-a-pot-of-gold/13404352/

Embracing Simple Pleasures

August 20, 2014 Posted by admin

Log in to manage your products and services from The New York Times and the International New York Times.

Don’t have an account yet?
Create an account »

Subscribed through iTunes and need an NYTimes.com account?
Learn more »

Article source: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/21/fashion/at-aurelie-bidermann-in-soho-jewelry-is-part-of-a-parisian-holiday.html

Five Ways to Get the Most Money Selling Your Jewelry

August 19, 2014 Posted by admin

One of the most common ways to make money selling gold or silver is through jewelry. It’s one of those items that accumulates over time. Sometimes the jewelry goes out of fashion, or an earring gets lost. Whatever your reason for selling, if you want to get the most money for your jewelry, just follow these simple steps.

1. Research Your Jewelry

The first step in getting the most for your jewelry is knowing what it is that you have. Sometimes items are handed down to you with a colorful family tale. Your great aunt Beatrice may have been telling you what she thought was the truth when she said that was a genuine Art Deco white gold and diamond ring. Not to say anything bad about Aunt Beatrice, but sometimes what one thinks is the truth, isn’t. Especially when it comes to family heirlooms.

So do your research. Test the metal to make sure it’s genuine gold. This can be done cheaply and easily. You can buy a metal test online for less than $20. In addition to testing, find out everything you can about the piece. You will typically find stamps on jewelry that indicate the brand, metal purity, and even the age. All of this will help you determine its value more accurately.

2. Find a Buyer

Many gold buyers have no experience as jewelers and will simply quote you the price of gold, not taking into consideration the value of the gemstones. A good buyer should weigh the jewelry in front of you. Then they should be able to explain how much gold or silver is in the piece by subtracting the estimated weight of the stones—or anything else not made of gold or silver. They should tell you how much the stones are worth, if anything. And finally, they should know if there is any intrinsic value or collectibility to the piece. Good buyers are well established and have a history of buying jewelry.

3. Know the Price of Gold and Silver

The more precious metal in the piece, the more the piece is worth. The current price of gold or silver is known as the spot price. No gold buyer is going to pay you the spot gold price. They will pay you the melt price—what it costs to melt the precious metal down to its purest form. And each gold buyer will take a small percentage as a commission. This commission and their ability to accurately estimate the jewelry’s value is why you will see evaluations of the same piece vary from buyer to buyer. It’s why you should do your homework and research buyers.

4. Be Realistic

It’s important that you’re honest with yourself about your jewelry, especially if it has sentimental value to you. You need to understand that you’re not going to get retail value for your jewelry. If you’re unwilling to take anything less than retail for your jewelry, then maybe you’re not ready to let go of it yet. And that’s OK. It’s better to just be honest and wait until you are ready. Trying to shop around and get a price that’s not realistic will simply frustrate you.

5. Get More Than One Opinion

Once you’ve done your research, it’s time to get out there. Be sure to ask for a free evaluation, and don’t be in a hurry to sell. Some places are going to pressure you to sell, and it’s easier to say no thanks after you’ve done your homework. You’ll be amazed by how much prices can vary from buyer to buyer. Some businesses try to pay you more (and make less for themselves), but make up the difference in volume. Others will attempt to pay you less and make more on fewer transactions. Liberty Coin Currency prefers the first approach.

Liberty Coin Currency specializes in rare coins and currency. We are a family-owned business located in Portland and Vancouver. We also buy gold, silver, diamonds, and jewelry. Visit us first for a free evaluation.

Do you like this post? Share it, +1 it on Google Plus, or like it on Facebook.

Article source: http://www.kgw.com/story/life/shopping/goldcoins/2014/08/19/five-ways-to-get-the-most-money-selling-jewelry/14291499/

Sentinel police log for Aug. 18

August 18, 2014 Posted by admin

The Sentinel area police log for Aug. 18:

Carlisle Police (243-5252)

• A green Mongoose BMX bike was stolen from the 200 block of East Louther Street on Aug. 16. Police said the bike is missing a pedal and has broken hand brakes. Police seek information.

• Scott E. Robinson, 31, of Carlisle, was charged Aug. 16 with misdemeanor disorderly conduct after police say he was running in and out of traffic on East High and North Bedford streets at 5:30 p.m. Aug. 15. Police said Robinson was arrested Aug. 16 on a warrant after being accused of running in and out of traffic through the whole block of East High Street, causing a hazard to himself and numerous vehicles. A traffic backlog was also caused, police said.

• A vehicle was damaged after an unknown suspect put water and sugar into the gas tank in a parking lot in the 100 block of North Bedford Street between Aug. 11 and 12. Police said the owner attempted to drive the vehicle, which had broken down. The damage was found by a mechanic during inspection. Police seek information.

• Money totaling $150 was stolen from an employee’s wallet while they worked at Project Share, 5 N. Orange St., between 9 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Aug. 15. Police seek information.

• A large flatscreen TV was stolen from a home in the 200 block of South Pitt Street between 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. Aug. 13. Police said the suspect entered the home through an unlocked door and stole the TV while a child slept upstairs, It is believed that the TV may have been sold to someone the same day, police said. Police are following leads which may lead them to the location of the TV, but encourage anyone who may have purchased a TV matching the description to contact them for resolution. Anyone found in the possession of the TV may face charges for receipt of stolen property, police said.

• Meghan E. Crist, 25, of Carlisle, was charged with misdemeanor simple assault and summary harassment in the 1100 block of Redwood Drive at 12:26 a.m. Aug. 13. Police said Crist assaulted a 42-year-old man, who had visible injuries to his head and back. The man stated that Crist jumped on him and began striking him with a cell phone, police said.

Middlesex Township Police (249-7191)

• Jewelry was stolen from a home in Regency Woods North Trailer Park after it was broken in to on Aug 16.

Silver Spring Township Police (697-0607)

• Michelle T. Bitting, 27, of Camp Hill, was charged with misdemeanor DUI, DUI highest rate, fraudulent registration, summary driving on a suspended license and driving without registration on Aug. 10, Police said the vehicle was pulled over for having an expired registration and Bitting was found driving and intoxicated.

• Kenneth E. Cline, 52, of Harrisburg, was charged Aug. 8 with felony retail theft, misdemeanor theft by deception and criminal attempt to theft by deception after two incidents in July at Wal-Mart, 6520 Carlisle Pike, Mechanicsburg. Police said on July 18, Cline returned a pair of boots that he picked up off of a shelf and did not pay for. He received a gift card for the fraudulent return. On July 27, he attempted to return a cell phone case that he picked up off of the shelf and did not pay for. The return was denied and he walked out of the store without paying for the item, police said.

Hampden Township Police (761-2609)

• A vandalism incident was reported in the 1900 block of Monterey Drive on Aug. 18.

• A theft was reported in the 200 block of Beaver Drive on Aug. 16.

• A theft was reported at Armitage Gold, 800 Orrs Bridge Road, on Aug. 13.

• A theft was reported in the 1400 block of Summit Way on Aug. 9.

West Shore Regional Police (737-8734)

• Brandon K. Schroll, 37, of Harrisburg, was charged with misdemeanor DUI in the 200 block of Walton Street, Lemoyne, at 1:25 a.m. Aug. 15. Police were called to the area for an unknown person attempting to get into a home. When police arrived, they found Schroll attempted to leave in a vehicle, police said. He was found to be intoxicated and arrested.

• Brian S. Collare, 43, of Lemoyne, was charged with misdemeanor DUI in the 700 block of North Front Street, Lemoyne, at 12:58 a.m. Aug. 10. Police said the vehicle was seen leaving its lane and was pulled over and Collare was found to be driving and intoxicated.

• Kadiatu Bangura, 21, of Camp Hill, was charged with misdemeanor DUI and DUI high rate on North Front and Stella streets, Wormleysburg, at 1:57 a.m. Aug. 2. Police said the vehicle was seen weaving in and out of traffic and was pulled over also for an expired Ohio registration. Police said Bangura was found driving and intoxicated. A passenger, Karly A. Schmidhamer, 23, of Wormleysburg, was charged with summary disorderly conduct and released to a relative.

East Pennsboro Township Police (732-3633)

• Rafeeq M. Bush, 21, of Summerdale, was charged with misdemeanor possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia on at Central Penn College, at 1:15 p.m., Aug. 14. Officers were called for a report of people smoking marijuana. Police said Bush was found in possession of a small amount of marijuana and drug paraphernalia.

• James R. Hall, 64, of Boiling Springs, was charged Aug. 14 with three misdemeanor counts of DUI controlled substance, possession of a controlled substance, summary driving on a suspended license with a blood alcohol content greater than 0.02 percent and vehicles turning left after an incident at 12:30 a.m. July 7. Police said the vehicle was pulled over for failing to yield the right of way while making a left hand turn in front of a motorcycle, and Hall was found driving and intoxicated.

• Rabanne H. Armstrong, 26, of Harrisburg, was charged Aug. 14 with misdemeanor false identification to law enforcement after an incident at 2:30 a.m. July 24. Police said officers were investigating a suspicious vehicle that was occupied by Armstrong. Police said Armstrong repeatedly provided false information to officers. He was arrested and identified.

• Jeremy N. Sell, 25, of Enola, was charged Aug. 14 with misdemeanor criminal mischief after an incident at 6:42 p.m. Aug. 1. Police said Sell caused $2,000 in damage to a vehicle.

Shippensburg Police (532-7361)

• Police are looking for an unknown vehicle after a hit-and-run incident in the 300 block of Walnut Street at 10:27 p.m. Aug. 13. Police said the unknown vehicle side-swiped a parked car and then drove off. Police seek information.

State Police at Carlisle (249-2121)

• A blue Trek 820 mountain bike was found at the intersection of Broad Street and Ocker Lane, Southampton Township, at 4:28 p.m. Aug, 17. Police seek information.

• A goat was found wandering on Interstate 81 Southbound near mile marker 38, Dickinson Township, on Aug,. 16, Police seek information.

• April R. Phillips, 35, of Carlisle, was charged with felony burglary, criminal trespass, misdemeanor theft and receiving stolen property after an incident at a home on Pine Road at Stuart Road, Dickinson Township, between 5:35 and 6 p.m. Aug. 15. Police said Phillips entered the home and stole cash.

State Police at Newport (567-3110)

• A 25-year-old woman reported she was raped by a person known to her at an unknown location in Perry County between 2 and 7 a.m. Aug. 17. Police are investigating.

• The driver’s side rear window of a vehicle was smashed in the first block of Spriggle Hollow Road, Saville Township, between aug. 12 and 17. Police seek information.

• A Centre Township man was scammed out of money in an incident on Royer Road, Centre Township, at 3:28 p.m. Aug. 15. Police said suspects claiming to be from PPL Utilities had the man send money via telephone stating that if he did not comply his power would be shut off.

• Several handguns were stolen from a home on Shuler Road, Carroll Township, between Aug. 13 and 15. No force was used to gain entry, police said. Police seek information.

• A diamond ring and $15 in quarters was stolen from a home in the first block of Rowe Drive, Tyrone Township, between 9 a.m. Aug. 13 and 7 p.m. Aug. 14.

• The grass of a yard in the 600 block of Mountain Road, Greenwood Township, was damaged between 8:30 p.m. Aug. 14 and 6:30 a.m. Aug. 15. Police seek information.

• A vehicle was stolen from the 400 block of Covered Bridge Road, Saville Township, at 10:50 p.m. Aug. 13. The vehicle was later recovered by the Mount Holly Springs Police Department on Aug. 14.

• Four people were injured in a crash on Route 322, Reed Township, at 1:36 p.m. Aug. 9. Police said Shaina R. Horne, 22, of Dauphin, was driving a 1994 Ford Explorer, attempting to make a left turn from the Pilot Truck Stop onto Route 322, when she pulled into the path of a 2006 Chrysler 300, driven by Zachary L. Zellers, 21, of Hamburg. Horne’s vehicle came to rest and Zellers’ vehicle went into opposing traffic, coming to rest off the road. All four, Horne, a passenger, Zellers and his passenger, were taken to Penn State Hershey Medical Center for moderate injuries. Newport, Duncannon and Halifax EMS assisted on the scene.

• No injuries were reported in a rollover crash on Windy Hill Road, Carroll Township, at 7 p.m. Aug. 8. Police said Devon L. Parmelee, 20, of Carlisle, was driving a 2010 Mazda Speed 3 north, when he lost control around a curve, thee vehicle went into a yard, hit a utility pole, hit a tree, hit an embankment and went airborne and overturned onto the driver’s side. Parmelee and two passengers were uninjured. He was charged with not driving at a safe speed, not driving on roadways laned for traffic, careless driving, driving without inspection and driving without insurance.

Article source: http://cumberlink.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/sentinel-police-log-for-aug/article_5378d0da-2703-11e4-92ad-001a4bcf887a.html